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all dog breeds

Affenpinscher

Affenpinscher

Afghan Hound

Afghan Hound

Airedale Terrier

Airedale Terrier

Akita

Akita

Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan Malamute

American English Coonhound

American English Coonhound

American Eskimo Dog

American Eskimo Dog

American Foxhound

American Foxhound

American Pit Bull Terrier

American Pit Bull Terrier

American Water Spaniel

American Water Spaniel

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

Appenzeller Sennenhunde

Appenzeller Sennenhunde

Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherd

Australian Terrier

Australian Terrier

Azawakh

Azawakh

Barbet

Barbet

Basenji

Basenji

Basset Hound

Basset Hound

Beagle

Beagle

Bearded Collie

Bearded Collie

Bedlington Terrier

Bedlington Terrier

Belgian Malinois

Belgian Malinois

Belgian Sheepdog

Belgian Sheepdog

Belgian Tervuren

Belgian Tervuren

Berger Picard

Berger Picard

Bernese Mountain Dog

Bernese Mountain Dog

Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise

Black and Tan Coonhound

Black and Tan Coonhound

Black Russian Terrier

Black Russian Terrier

Bloodhound

Bloodhound

Bluetick Coonhound

Bluetick Coonhound

Bolognese

Bolognese

Border Collie

Border Collie

Border Terrier

Border Terrier

Borzoi

Borzoi

Boston Terrier

Boston Terrier

Bouvier des Flandres

Bouvier des Flandres

Boxer

Boxer

Boykin Spaniel

Boykin Spaniel

Bracco Italiano

Bracco Italiano

Briard

Briard

Brittany

Brittany

Brussels Griffon

Brussels Griffon

Bull Terrier

Bull Terrier

Bulldog

Bulldog

Bullmastiff

Bullmastiff

Cairn Terrier

Cairn Terrier

Canaan Dog

Canaan Dog

Cane Corso

Cane Corso

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Catahoula Leopard Dog

Catahoula Leopard Dog

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Cesky Terrier

Cesky Terrier

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Chihuahua

Chihuahua

Chinese Crested

Chinese Crested

Chinese Shar-Pei

Chinese Shar-Pei

Chinook

Chinook

Chow Chow

Chow Chow

Clumber Spaniel

Clumber Spaniel

Cockapoo

Cockapoo

Cocker Spaniel

Cocker Spaniel

Collie

Collie

Coton de Tulear

Coton de Tulear

Curly-Coated Retriever

Curly-Coated Retriever

Dachshund

Dachshund

Dalmatian

Dalmatian

Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Doberman Pinscher

Doberman Pinscher

Dogue de Bordeaux

Dogue de Bordeaux

English Cocker Spaniel

English Cocker Spaniel

English Foxhound

English Foxhound

English Setter

English Setter

English Springer Spaniel

English Springer Spaniel

English Toy Spaniel

English Toy Spaniel

Entlebucher Mountain Dog

Entlebucher Mountain Dog

Field Spaniel

Field Spaniel

Finnish Lapphund

Finnish Lapphund

Finnish Spitz

Finnish Spitz

Flat-Coated Retriever

Flat-Coated Retriever

Fox Terrier

Fox Terrier

French Bulldog

French Bulldog

German Pinscher

German Pinscher

German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherd Dog

German Shorthaired Pointer

German Shorthaired Pointer

German Wirehaired Pointer

German Wirehaired Pointer

Giant Schnauzer

Giant Schnauzer

Glen of Imaal Terrier

Glen of Imaal Terrier

Goldador

Goldador

Golden Retriever

Golden Retriever

Goldendoodle

Goldendoodle

Gordon Setter

Gordon Setter

Great Dane

Great Dane

Great Pyrenees

Great Pyrenees

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

Greyhound

Greyhound

Harrier

Harrier

Havanese

Havanese

Ibizan Hound

Ibizan Hound

Icelandic Sheepdog

Icelandic Sheepdog

Irish Red and White Setter

Irish Red and White Setter

Irish Setter

Irish Setter

Irish Terrier

Irish Terrier

Irish Water Spaniel

Irish Water Spaniel

Irish Wolfhound

Irish Wolfhound

Italian Greyhound

Italian Greyhound

Jack Russell Terrier

Jack Russell Terrier

Japanese Chin

Japanese Chin

Korean Jindo Dog

Korean Jindo Dog

Keeshond

Keeshond

Kerry Blue Terrier

Kerry Blue Terrier

Komondor

Komondor

Kooikerhondje

Kooikerhondje

Kuvasz

Kuvasz

Labradoodle

Labradoodle

Labrador Retriever

Labrador Retriever

Lakeland Terrier

Lakeland Terrier

Lancashire Heeler

Lancashire Heeler

Leonberger

Leonberger

Lhasa Apso

Lhasa Apso

Lowchen

Lowchen

Maltese

Maltese

Maltese Shih Tzu

Maltese Shih Tzu

Maltipoo

Maltipoo

Manchester Terrier

Manchester Terrier

Mastiff

Mastiff

Miniature Pinscher

Miniature Pinscher

Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzer

Mutt

Mutt

Neapolitan Mastiff

Neapolitan Mastiff

Newfoundland

Newfoundland

Norfolk Terrier

Norfolk Terrier

Norwegian Buhund

Norwegian Buhund

Norwegian Elkhound

Norwegian Elkhound

Norwegian Lundehund

Norwegian Lundehund

Norwich Terrier

Norwich Terrier

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Old English Sheepdog

Old English Sheepdog

Otterhound

Otterhound

Papillon

Papillon

Peekapoo

Peekapoo

Pekingese

Pekingese

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Pharaoh Hound

Pharaoh Hound

Plott

Plott

Pocket Beagle

Pocket Beagle

Pointer

Pointer

Polish Lowland Sheepdog

Polish Lowland Sheepdog

Pomeranian

Pomeranian

Poodle

Poodle

Portuguese Water Dog

Portuguese Water Dog

Pug

Pug

Puggle

Puggle

Puli

Puli

Pyrenean Shepherd

Pyrenean Shepherd

Rat Terrier

Rat Terrier

Redbone Coonhound

Redbone Coonhound

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Rottweiler

Rottweiler

Saint Bernard

Saint Bernard

Saluki

Saluki

Samoyed

Samoyed

Schipperke

Schipperke

Schnoodle

Schnoodle

Scottish Deerhound

Scottish Deerhound

Scottish Terrier

Scottish Terrier

Sealyham Terrier

Sealyham Terrier

Shetland Sheepdog

Shetland Sheepdog

Shiba Inu

Shiba Inu

Shih Tzu

Shih Tzu

Siberian Husky

Siberian Husky

Silky Terrier

Silky Terrier

Skye Terrier

Skye Terrier

Sloughi

Sloughi

Small Munsterlander Pointer

Small Munsterlander Pointer

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Stabyhoun

Stabyhoun

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Standard Schnauzer

Standard Schnauzer

Sussex Spaniel

Sussex Spaniel

Swedish Vallhund

Swedish Vallhund

Tibetan Mastiff

Tibetan Mastiff

Tibetan Spaniel

Tibetan Spaniel

Tibetan Terrier

Tibetan Terrier

Toy Fox Terrier

Toy Fox Terrier

Treeing Tennessee Brindle

Treeing Tennessee Brindle

Treeing Walker Coonhound

Treeing Walker Coonhound

Vizsla

Vizsla

Weimaraner

Weimaraner

Welsh Springer Spaniel

Welsh Springer Spaniel

Welsh Terrier

Welsh Terrier

West Highland White Terrier

West Highland White Terrier

Whippet

Whippet

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Xoloitzcuintli

Xoloitzcuintli

Yorkipoo

Yorkipoo

Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier

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Bengal Cat Breed Profile

Bengals at a glance

Playfulness *****
Energy *****
Shedding **
Friendliness ****
Lifespan ****
Health ****
Talkative ****
Good with dogs *****
Child-friendly *****
Intelligence *****

History of the Bengal cat

Bengal cat

Originally christened the Leopardette, the Bengal cat is a hybridization of domestic cats and Asian Leopard Cats (a small wild cat). In 1963 Jean Sudgen of Yuma, Arizona purchased a female Asian Leopard cat (named Malaysia) from a pet store. Believing the cat to be lonely, she put a black domestic cat in her cage for company. The animals mated and produced two kittens, a male and a female called KinKin.

Sadly, the male was fatally mauled by Malaysia but KinKin was safely removed and raised by a Himalayan queen. Jean contacted Cornell University who predicted that KinKin would be sterile. This proved to be incorrect when KinKin was mated back to her father and delivered two kittens. A black female and a spotted male.  Due to the sudden death of her husband this project was abandoned.

In 1980 Jean contacted geneticist Dr Willard Centerwall who was working on a breeding programme which involved crossing Leopard Cats with domestic cats. This was part of a study of Feline Leukaemia. Jean Sudgen (now living in California and remarried as Jean Mill) obtained several F1 (the F stands for Filial) hybrids from this programme.

While in India in 1982 Jean and her husband came across a tailless feral domestic male with markings similar to that of the leopard. He had been living in a rhino enclosure at Delhi zoo. Jean imported this cat (named Millwood Tory of Delhi) back to the United States and he was mated with the female hybrids. Other domestic breeds were used in the breeding programme including Ocicats, Egyptian Maus, Abyssinians, Bombays and British Shorthairs. The Bengal cat was recognised by The International Cat Association as a new breed in 1986 and awarded championship status in 1991.

Appearance of the Bengal cat

 

The Bengal is a wild-looking cat with the sweet nature of a domestic cat. They are a medium to large breed weighing between 5 – 7 kg (11 – 15 lbs), the males are larger than females.

They have a long, well-muscled body with robust bones. Its hind legs are slightly longer than the front legs, the feet are large and oval.

The head is a broad modified wedge, which is longer than wide, with small ears and pronounced whisker pads. Eyes are black rimmed and almond shaped they can range in colour from golden to deep green.

The tail is thick, tapering to a black tip.

The coat is thick, beautifully sleek and soft feels more like a pelt than fur. The belly is whited and should also have spots.

All in all, the Bengal is a well-balanced cat with no extreme features

Bengal cat markings

There are two Bengal patterns. Spotted and Marbled.

Spotted: The spots should be dark and clear, with a crisp outline with a good contrast to the background colour.  The spots can be either solid, arrow-shaped or as rosettes. Spots should be found on the body, including the belly, the legs will have spots and or stripes. Spots should be random or horizontal in alignment.

Marbled: The marbled pattern consists of contrasting horizontal swirls along the side of the cat.  The contrast must be extreme.

Glitter: Bengal cats have a gene known as the glitter gene. It is believed this came from the kitten Jean Mill imported from India. It is a recessive gene and is highly desirable in the Bengal. It looks as if a handful of gold has been sprinkled over the coat.

Bengal cat colours

Traditional tabby colours: Brown potted and Brown Marbled.

Sepia tabby colours: Seal Sepia Spotted Tabby and Seal Sepia Marbled Tabby.

Mink colours: Seal Mink Spotted Tabby and Seal Mink Marbled Tabby.

Silver tabby colours: Silver Spotted Tabby and Silver Marbled Tabby.

Bengal cat personality

Bengals are intelligent, active, inquisitive and energetic cats. Due to their Asian Leopard Cat ancestry, many Bengals have a love of water and will drink from and play with the water from a dripping tap. Bengals are often quite happy to play in 1-2 inches of water in the bath if allowed (but it needs to be said that you should never force this on your cat).

They are agile, love to climb should be provided with places to climb and watch the world from a height.

Bengals get along well with other pets and people and don’t tend to play favourites with any one member of the household.

They are a high energy breed and are known to enjoy high places and are enthusiastic climbers. Many Bengal owners have trained their cat to walk on a harness, so they can enjoy the great outdoors in safety. It is always best to start harness training when your Bengal is a kitten and recognise that not all Bengals will take to this…although many do.

Bengal cats love to play, well into adulthood. Fetch, stalking and pouncing on a wand toy, chasing toy mice are some of their favourite games. Their intelligence means they pick up new tricks quickly.

If you are out a lot of the time it is recommended that you get your Bengal a companion so that he doesn’t become lonely. Some Bengals can become depressed or destructive if left alone for long periods of time.

Words used to describe Bengals include: active, intelligent, playful, willful, energetic.

Adopting a Bengal cat

  • Bengals should be purchased from a registered cat breeder. Ask the breeder who they are registered with and check with the registering body to ensure they are listed. It is also recommended you ask for references from other people who have purchased a kitten from the breeders, if possible. Get everything in writing.
  • Try to meet the Bengal’s parents as well as the Bengal you hope to purchase. This will give you a good idea of the personality and friendliness of the kitten. I always prefer to adopt cats who have been raised ‘under foot’, meaning they grew up in the home around other cats and people.
  • Ask the breeder about health guarantees and what genetic and health testing has been performed on the kitten and his parents.
  • Kittens should be at least 12 weeks of age before they are allowed to leave the breeder. He should have been regularly wormed, had his vaccinations and the majority of breeders will have microchipped and desexed the kitten prior to him going to his new home.
  • Bengal cats should be at least fourth generation F4 from their wild ancestors.
Did you know?Some breeds of cat, including the Bengal, can have a primordial pouch. This is a loose flap of skin on the belly, just in front of the hind legs. Many pet owners mistake the primordial pouch for fat, but this is not the case.  It is not entirely known what purpose the primordial pouch served but it is believed it may be there to protect the cat’s belly (which of course houses the vulnerable internal organs) area during a fight.

I don’t have a photo of one on a Bengal, but here is an Abyssinian with a primordial pouch. You can also see one on the Asian Leopard Cat at the top of the page.

Image source Matt, Flickr

 

Bengal cat health

Bengal cats are generally healthy but can be prone to developing the following medical conditions.

  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
  • Distal neuropathy
  • Flat chested syndrome
  • Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency
  • Patellar luxation
  • Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA)
  • Polycystic kidney disease

There are genetic tests for some of the conditions above, others may be diagnosed with tests. It is always recommended that you see your own veterinarian when you bring your new kitten home.

Caring or your Bengal cat

Bengals are shorthaired, so a quick 10-minute groom once a week is more than enough to maintain their coat. As with the majority of shorthaired cats, Bengals don’t need a bath.

They are intelligent and like to be active, so are suited for homes who can give them plenty of attention and play time. They are not a cat who likes to sleep on your lap 23 hours a day.

Caring for your Bengal’s teeth is important for good health. They should be regularly cleaned with a pet toothbrush and paste (never use human toothpaste on cats), or you can give them human grade chunks of raw steak or chicken necks to chew on.

As with all cats, Bengals should see a veterinarian once a year for a health check-up, your veterinarian can discuss with you vaccination recommendations during the consult.

Keep the toilet seat down at all times to prevent your Bengal trying to take a dip in the loo.

Is the Bengal cat hypoallergenic?

Some claim that the Bengal is hypoallergenic, but no breed is truly hypoallergenic. Bengals may be better tolerated by people with allergies as they tend to shed less than other cat breeds, meaning there will be less hair and dander in the environment.

Speak to the breeder if you are considering adopting a Bengal cat. Always go to their home to meet the cats and see how you cope with them. Never adopt a cat based on what you have been told about their hypoallergenic status. See for yourself.

Bengal cat lifespan

The average lifespan of a Bengal cat is between 12 – 15 years.

Are Bengal cats talkative?

Yes, Bengals can be very talkative and have an array of distinctive sounds they can make from chirping to howling and every sound in between.

 

credit:

cat-world.com.au/bengal-cat-breed-profile.html

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The Grumpy Cat Story

Tardar Sauce, commonly known as Grumpy Cat, is a cat Internet and media personality, and actress. She is known for her permanently “grumpy” facial appearance, which is caused by an underbite and feline dwarfism.

Born: 4 April 2012, Morristown, Arizona, United States
Species: Felis catus
Breed: Mixed
Named after: Tartar sauce
Owner: Tabatha Bundesen
Parents: Calico mother and unknown father
Known for: Internet meme

Information source: Wikipedia

 

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Looking for dogs for adoption in NZ?

Before you can adopt a dog, we need to ensure that the adoption will be safe and healthy for both you and the animal:

http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/licencesregulations/dogsandanimals/lostadoptablepets/Pages/dogadoption.aspx

Places to adopt a dog:

Dogs For Adoption – spcaauckland.org.nz‎

  1. Adwww.spcaauckland.org.nz/
    Start a relationship that lasts for life. Adopt a pet today.
Below is an article on dog adoption:

Why I’d never adopt a shelter dog again | Stuff.co.nz

www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/life/10286859/Why-I-d-never-adopt-a-shelter-dog-again

Jul 19, 2014 – BLACK DOG: Raven, a 10-week-old Staff Mix, was abandoned by his owners and was available for adoption at the AucklandSPCA. Would you …

 Trademe dogs to adopt:

Dogs to adopt | Dogs | Trade Me

www.trademe.co.nz/pets-animals/dogs/dogs-to-adopt

Dogs to adopt for sale in New Zealand. Buy and sell Dogs to adopt on Trade Me.

‎Hounds 4 Homes Inc · ‎Bichon shih tzu/shar pei · ‎Second Chance Dog Rescue
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Pet Movie

2016 ‧ Thriller/Horror ‧ 1h 34m
5.7/10IMDb50%Rotten Tomatoes0.5/4Roger Ebert
Sweet but lonely Seth spends his days working in an animal shelter. In a hopeless daze, he has a chance encounter with beautiful young waitress Holly, who awakens something within him. Obsessed, he tries everything to win her over. Time and again, she rejects him, leading him to steal her journal and make a plan: to kidnap Holly. After Seth takes Holly, she wakes up in a cage beneath the animal shelter and is being treated like the dogs living above her.
Initial release: 2016 (Spain)
Director: Carles Torrens
Box office: 70 USD
Screenplay: Jeremy Slater
Distributed by: Orion Pictures, Samuel Goldwyn Films
Ksenia Solo
Holly
Dominic Monaghan
Seth
Jennette McCurdy
Claire
Nathan Parsons
Janet Song
Mrs. Gundy
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Industrial News: Australian pet brand Petstock plans aggressive expansion in NZ

 

One of Australia’s leading pet retail companies has crossed the ditch and has plans to grow aggressively.

Petstock is a family-owned business with more than 100 stores across Australia and four stores so far in New Zealand.

It launched here in June 2015, when it acquired two Petmarket stores – one on Constellation Drive on Auckland’s North Shore and the other in Cambridge.

It then bought Four Seasons Pets in Auckland’s Glenn Innes and Takapuna last September.

The next store, based in the Auckland suburb of New Lynn, is due to open in late May or early June.

Country manager Aaron Waters says the burgeoning pet industry is what brought the Australian business to New Zealand.

“We were growing rapidly in Australia and thought our competitors were growing well in New Zealand so there was a good market opportunity here,” he said.

Research from Roy Morgan showed almost 60 per cent Kiwis (2.1 million people) own at least one cat or dog and 15 per cent of cat or dog owners pay for pet care services in an average month.

It also seems that cats truly rule in New Zealand, with 45 per cent, or 1.6 million Kiwis owning cats while 3.1 per cent have dogs.

More than 18 per cent can’t make up their minds and have at least one of each.

Kiwis’ incredible love for their four-legged family members is evident in the “massive” premiumisation of pet food, where pet food companies that produce organic, higher quality and apparently healthier grub dominate pet stores, Waters says.

‘I guess we’ve evolved from a farmer having a dog on the back of a ute throwing them a couple of Tux bikkies every day to actually thinking about what we feed our pets and the nutritional value of that,” he says.

Along with pet food, Petstock also provides a DIY dog wash facility, dog grooming service and puppy training school in its stores

At the Constellation Drive store, there is also a full service vet clinic – the first, but not last, in the country.

Waters says along with “aggressive” growth of stores this year, the company is also planning on rolling out more vet clinics.

 

Credit: TAO LIN stuff.co.nz